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Search Results 71 to 99 of about 100 (some duplicates have been removed)
and that will be live google plus streamed. all sorts of fun technology. but before the publication of her book, and the subsequent film, this was probably one of the most famous compositions by verm ere, certainly the most famous, and has three paintings and i love that the way that the clouds hang so low and it is actually much darker on my screen, but this kind of balance between the rain clouds and the white pufffy clouds and the way that they interacts with the buildings in the city. this competes with two other paintings in the exhibition and i will not say which ones they are and it competes for my favorite painting in the exhibition it is view of harlem with bleaching grounds in the foregrounds and one of the most important innovations for the 17th century, dutch landscape painters was the way that they approached the sky. for any of you who have traveled to the netherlands you know that there is a low horizon line and i have been told that the dutch people and i can be corrected. that they call their clouds the dutch mountains because the landscape is so low that really you get these m
information technology department. some of whom those members are here standing around the room. i see a half dozen or so. advocated by the chairwomanas city college, and mr. al yeatts and others. we have established media opportunity and entrepreneurship opportunity through a simple class. with the support of southeast facility -- if you give me 30 seconds. of dr. jackson and the black leadership chapter we have provided for a model program for the teens. we would like to take our program off line and continue pushing this program forward mr. mayor. >> hi, i am lana miller, with hu hunter's point family. and i have so many things to talk about and so many things we are passionate and work on. now i am here in my role as a member of the mental health board and particularly for trauma and community related violence. i know for the last years barbara garcia has counted mental services in d-10 as community and violence and trauka. and for years we have talked about it and talked about it and when we try to engage the department of health, we got yes we understand it's a priority but we don't kno
of technology and i see it sort of akin to and i read an article recently. what you are trying to do now is obviously face risk decisions now on much more empirically based situation. now the pretrial diversion project and pretrial release is really the hummer so to speak. the district attorney and sheriff set the policy. we have been working or this base practice for years. obviously the major stake holders, the district attorneys, the she rifs. just to give you an idea of the scope of what we are doing. approximately 1100 people come out of jail from our program. this time we are targeting somewhere around 1500 cases. prior to the last 3 or 4 years, the data that is now coming in, recidivism is around 6 or 7 percent, failure to appear rate or people to appear in court is lower. they are walking people out of jail. we've just come out of a difficult 4-5 years and that is budget years with a lot of social services being cut and really at the end of the day when you are talking about it and talking about housing and talking about employment, you are talking about counseling; you are tal
the technology companies that i have been talking with every week and ask them what draws their talent to a city, the first three things they know whether it's public transportation, it's also the arts. because that's what keeps their creative mind functioning. and it's these institutions with their wonderful service and their continuing exhibitions, world renown exhibitions that introduce and keep their minds active and keeps the tremendous amounts of visitors coming to our city. i know how difficult it has been for board and for the president to make quick search, to matchup the right person with such an incredible institution as these are. i for one, know how difficult it is and when you are trying to do that when you are running government, i want to also say to the staff that i enjoyed mr. buchannon's leadershipa as much as you do, to fill those shoes with mr. bailey i'm excited because i trust the board of trustees, the time you took to select him, i'm going to welcome mr. bailey and look forward to and excited to do it. this city is on such a great recovery economically for everybody that
it wasn't just the fire department alone. it took a lot of work from the department of technology to the department of city planning, i saw brian strong here early and ken rich from the mayor's office. a whole host of people, and we have john green who is our department captain, who earlier this morning gave a very special blessing upstairs in the dining facility to all the members at station 1 and for blessing this building and all the work done here. few other folks that i would like to acknowledge, local 798, the men and women presented by tom o'connor behind me, thank you, tom. as well as some of his members of the executive board here, thanks very much to local 798. there is two retired deputies here. i have seen this happen. i'm grateful they came back because it's this early phase, he got us where we are at today. thank you very much. [ applause ] and also retired deputy chief of operation patrick guard who was a member of station one 1 gaevend us -- gave us a lot of input. most of my command staff is behind me. just like when you go out and run a call you count on each ot
that bullying now doesn't happen just in schools. with the internet and all of the technology that we have, it can happen anywhere. so thank you so much for being here, it's a great honor to host you here and i look forward to a very engaging conversation today. thank you. >> now i want to tell you my fae vifrt very favorite department of justice official. eric holder is my favorite department of justice official. tom perez is my second favorite department of justice official. we are very honored today that tom perez has come from washington, dc, to give welcoming remarks here at this summit. tom perez is the assistant attorney general of the civil rights division in washington, dc, he was nominated for that position by president obama and sworn in in october of 2009 and we are all the lucky -- we are all very lucky that that happened in october of 2009. tom has spent his entire career in public service and on protecting the civil rights of our most vulnerable people. tom actually joined the civil rights division as a young lawyer and while he was there he prosecuted some of the most
of all this, the new technology, we're all catching up, there are two, three pieces of legislation that i co-authored, i am not the sponsor, that deals with cyber bullying. i will say the social networking folks have been very cooperative about that. so just, in sum, we have sacramento's intention, ladies and gentlemen, we are waiting for the pope -- i mean the governor it -- to sign these bills. it's a very mechanical things but anything you can do to encourage the govern rr to sign the bills that deal with this issue. unfortunately they are a drop in the bucket, they don't bring seth back or your son or your daughter. we are quite aware of that and i think that's a thought that we always are going to hold in our minds because that will help influence further legislation. this is a good segue, probably, to mr. torres. we work very well with his department and he's extremely receptive and action-oriented. >> i think that's great that we have so much cooperation with departments in sacramento. that's great to her. go ahead, expand on that. >> thank you to the u.s. attorney for gatheri
and technology and command and control and mostly we bring a how can i help you, how can i work to support your mission, how can i make a difference? is your hospital structure so overloaded and so overburdened and so overcrowded and so crushed that we need to off load patients to other counties, to other states, to other areas in the country? do your roads work? do you have a transportation infrastructure, do you have a communications net up? no? we can bring that. we come as we are. we constantly prepare for the next major conflict. in the navy our motto is -- this is big navy's motto -- a global force for good. we believe that we operate on a continuum of bringing heat and light. you are sitting on one of those platforms right now. you are sitting on this amazing lhd, the uss macon island, it can bring the heat or it can bring the light. do you want to get a little twitchy around the world and you want to sort of rattle the cage a little bit and test our will and show bravado? you don't want an amphibious group showing up off your shore. that can be a bad day for you. on the other
the resolve and the resiliencke of these people. technology obviously was impacted so in order to get us a letter in the quickest amount of time possible, they typed it on an old typewriter, took a picture of it and emailed us the jpeg. no scaner, nothing like that, it was a jpeg of a leg. i said, good enough, it's a letter. we took that to ann kronenberg and said here we are, what can we do. in the meantime we did some brain storms, is this something real, is there any value we can add to this scenario? what we came up with was obviously we don't have the deep pockets to send over rebuilding teams or send over thousands and thousands of tons of material, that's just not what we could do. but what we could do is assemble a small team to go on a mission to van and meet them and talk to them and find out more about what do they need and is there an intersection of what we can do for them and in the meantime it gives us an opportunity to really look and see what the situation was and what we can take away from it. so that led to the next question, which all of us in government understan
technology for that information sharing and interoperatability. apm was an online collaboration where we were able to share information and learn how to communicate with each other. one of the things that we realized is we have a problem with interchange of information where we actually are able to share that. and that was one opportunity that we were able to do that. quick net also participated with us, allowed us to be able to have civil social interaction with the military and have us be able to interchange with them and knowing what type of response we had. intelligence carry on program and deployable joint command and control are two of the systems that were used by the military to collect information and organize it appropriately so that we were able to respond and interact with the civilian agencies. so for the take aways, it provided us an opportunity for real exchange and interaction. the military has a lot of capability and sometimes we don't always know how best to modify that in an appropriate response and being able to get together and practice the situation allowed us to u
how to use technology. what i want to do with you is to show you what i have done that has been successful for me to get vandals arrested. and what we did is pretty good. we use a couple things. anybody ever heard of graffiti tracker? you haven't? awesome program, right. if you guys don't have graffiti tracker yet, we're going to talk about graffiti tracker. that's one of the biggest things i use. when i first came to this detail, i was a body hate crimes school violence detector when i first came to this detail. next thing they said, budget cuts. they got rid of school violence for some reason and then gave me graffiti. i was like, ah, hell no, graffiti? [laughter] >> hey, when you work the road, you get that hot call for graffiti. you guys are passionate because you're here obviously. most of the time i listen to the radio and they slow all that. you know what i'm saying? it's just graffiti, just a misdemeanor. but we talk about it, it's not just graffiti, it is a gateway crime. we're doing a study right now as we speak, we're into our second year showing that it's not just gr
technologies, often by a robot... or personally by a technician on a bicycle. sensors detect breaks, cracks, and weaknesses in the pipe. man: we have roots at this cap lateral at 79. narrator: tree roots can grow into the pipe, splitting it apart. man: more light roots at 69. narrator: sometimes they may even find fully collapsed sections. after gathering the data, utilities can assess the need for rehabilitation. sinha: you have to choose the rehabilitation technique so that the life of the pipe can be extended 30 years, 40 years, 50 years. allbee: any asset has an optimal investment strategy. if you're making investments in that asset too early, or too late, you're wasting money. it costs about three times as much to fix a system once it's failed. so it's all about finding that right point where the dollars should flow toward that asset. narrator: but finding the funds to evaluate and rebuild these assets is an ongoing struggle. johnson: there is a gap between what's being spent by municipalities and water supply systems and what needs to be spent. and somehow that has to be made up. so t
of electronic technology, we're going to see more and more need for electronic health records. hit systems are going to be a godsend for our profession. being able to share that, that demographic information and treatment plans and progress notes is going to be very important to help that person move quicker in their recovery and get more comprehensive recovery. if a recovering person can find employment early on in their recovery, it lends self-value. it helps a person's self-image to feel gainfully employed. i like to tell employers, when i do employer training, that the thing about people in recovery is that you know what their issue is. you don't have to guess. i believe it's very important to the person in recovery, for a sense of self-responsibility and human dignity, and for the employer, in seeing that he has a workforce that's largely untapped, that's willing to work and will be loyal to the employer. the reason why i got into this profession is because of my family history. in my own recovery, i started using before the age of 10, and had a lot of medical issues as a result of ea
for ways to become more productive through the implementation of the better use of it can technology and capital investment and this period right after the recession, businesses were spending a lot and sort-of loss a lot of mommentum here and not completely convinced that they have lots the way and they are not going into hiding either. this line the biggest take away looking at this graph may be legible from where you are sittings and i'll try do what i can to call out the lints that most people care about g d p is two% it's a little weaker than that in the opt year because you get a slower start because of the tax that weighs on consumer spending in the first couple of quarters inflation is more or less in line with the fed's target rate of roughly two% and i i think we do a farrell decedent job with our forecast and you can tabling me into talking about upside or down side risk here with you there is one line federal funds target rate and i feel confidant about our forecast for that line because the federal reserve is told that is where they are going to keep the short term inter
? >> yes, they have come out with a lot of new technologies, and the flushing systems are a lot more powerful. this toilet in particular has the new double cyclone feature, which shoots out of the rim and the bowl. let's look at it. shoots out here and here, so it cleans the ball really well as it flushes. >> there are lots and lots of brands. this is just one brand. these are manufactured in japan? >> these are manufactured all over the world. they have two factories in georgia and then factories all around the world. >> what are the differences between these different kind of toilets? >> we have the 1.28, which is what all the manufacturers are doing now to conserve water. this is a siphon flush with a larger water surface area, much more conventional american type of toilet. it has been used around the world for many years as a water- conserving light of flushing. it has a small water surface area and is a wash down type of toilet. some americans are not happy that they might have to clean the sides of the ball more. then, we have the high end totally automated toilet as you were
, and i think you kind of touched on this, that for maybe financial reasons or because you technology people are so influential in the world you convinced these banks they had to do this, it just really made my life miserable for a couple of weeks trying to figure out how to use their new system. i mean, it seems to me that -- you know, i had the impression that technology people are sort of making work for themselves by influencing institutions that they need to change what they have already in place. i still go by the old model -- if it is not broken, do not fix it. so i am opposing these questions to the senate panel. >> those are great observations. i am in my mid-40's by now, and there are programming languages used regularly that just did not exist five years ago. when you hear these guys talk, it is like gobbledygook to me. you get old with your music. you get old with your skills sets. it is just the way it is. because we are a technology- driven society, and we have completely inverted the traditional way back societies were built when -- where when you were older, what you l
the pandora is growings and they have a cluster around those -- foundation and is-head up more technology those of you who remember back to our college level the software, the founder of that foundation officer and would be the [inaudible/incomprehensible] small technology company it doesn't seem that small, certain we are about half the size of san francisco but when we have these clerks of people comeling forth into that industry hundreds and hundreds of people are there and i don't know why they are there but after the -- [inaudible] yeah, we are being blockbusters but we have-newborn [inaudible] have been trying to lure other companies -- and oakland you can attract the berkeley base -- there. so there are a lot of people who want to live and work in the east and that is happening or and more. >> may be you are lucky you didn't get -- [inaudible/incomprehensible] >>> i know i noticed. >> mayor lee for san francisco you can turn that question entirely on it's head so much of the city's prosperity has been from tech company leastings and hiring and there are signs that, that migh
with this technology that can be scaled up into eco districts and community scale systems, campus-type systems where in those situations when the water is reused and the numbers are much higher, 50,000, 100,000, 200,000 gallons a day, imagine the savings on that that you're getting. you're not purchasing freshwater and you're not using the sewer and being charged appropriately. this wastewater processing and reuse technology is cutting edge. and although it's been successfully implemented in other cities, it will be one of the first such installations in an urban office building. >> here is a city agency that treats wastewater, but they send no wastewater to the treatment facility. that says a lot. >> it's got a 12 gallon per day occupancy using 5,000 gallons per day with a building officing 1,000 people. that turns out to save over 2.7 million gallons a year. >> the public utilities commission runs water, power and sewer services for san francisco. we can't afford to be out of business after an earthquake. so, we're thinking about building a building. that building is going to hold our operations c
in technology and healthcare as well and case veer certainly helps our entire community thrive and then one s f which, is out of the organizing committee and one s f and i hope you take time to get very familiar with what this organization is doing for san francisco and how you can utilize this organization to become a part of the american's cup experience. one s f is mobilizing san francisco's corporation and is citizens behind the many many community and legacy benefits of the america's cup and there are many. cruise ship terminal infrastructure projects and so when you become a one s f partner you will drive that local effort and help provide the funding support and there are so many exciting ways you can become aligned with the cup this exciting year and so one s f of the america's cup organizing committee and really the mayor will say more about that and robert half international i have to thank them for helping me find my great business manager this year just on the side and i wanted to thank randal my second who's regent vice president of mice executive international and they help us
improve these systems, you need to deploy the latest technology. woman: the pipe bursting process is designed to replace an old pipe without digging an entire trench. the old pipe has cracks and displaced joints and openings in it. we try to stop, not only infiltration, but exfiltration, where sewage would actually leak out of the pipe. the head is larger, so it breaks away the old pipe and allows the new pipe to come in behind it. griffin: we are saving about 67% of the cost of actually digging old pipe up. clyne: it's less invasive than an open-cut process, where you would open the whole trench up and replace the pipe. it's called "trenchless" technology, so... that's as good as it gets. griffin: we don't have to dig up everyone's yard, and we refurbish that pipe at a much-reduced cost. another technique, the cured-in-place lining. it's equivalent to putting a large sock through the existing sewer. we form a new pipe inside the old pipe, and therefore we seal up all of the defects that allow rainwater to come in. hunter: we repair about 730 leaks a month in our system. griffin:
scared of them at first. the technology was a little heywire in the beginning -- haywire in the beginning. they could go very fast, but people thought they were too dangerous. but eventually trolley cars starting taking over. and in the early 1890's, the railway company started buying up transit companies across the city. wherever they could, they tried to replace the old forms of technology, horse cars and cable cars, with these cheaper, more energy-efficient electric trolley cars. the question was what to do with all the old cars. they had an idea. they took an ad out in the paper. they said the market street railway had all of these old cars. you could buy one without seats for $10 or with seats for $20. they had some suggestions with what people could do with the old horse cars and cable cars. they could be used for news stands, fruit stands, lunch stands, play houses, poultry houses, tool houses, coal sheds, conservatories and polling booths, etc. and it really is a testament to the market street railway's imagination that these cars essentially got used for all of these different pu
. now each time we have a meeting we try to do some new training or talk about the technology available, i will talk about the technology in my class this afternoon. it's really good because we document it because when you go to court, you can show training on a monthly basis. conferences, i can't tell you how excited i am these are happening. only in the last two or three years have these major conferences come about. the one up in canada, they were a great group of conferences and other people started to pick up on this. when i became an officer dealing with gravanis in 1991, there were no conferences and there was virtually no interest. as dr. spicer mentioned, every time it got good, i foupld myself out of a job. i was out of a job for about 6 months because it fell apart and then came back together. mer and more cities are realizing gravanis is a pattern crime and as dr. spicer pointed out, it's a great way crime to many other activities. so you can wind up precluding with a lot of other stuff by dealing with them when they are down to the part doing gravanis damage before th
agree that technology, expediting our kids earlier with the expectation for college and seth them to in our economies is the keys key to success and we're making progress. san francisco unified continues to be the hive urban development are high. we've seen double digit high-grades among our latin and africa kids >> results are being recognized for our achievement we received a federal grab the to bring job training in our mission neighborhood. the supervisor knows about this. these gains are possible because reforms are underway the partnership are in place. for our kids to succeed in this economy we must do more. that's why this year i will propose in my budgeted more resources more than $50,000,000,000 and $25 million for preschool activities. i view education as an be investment not an expense. the folk in the road for many kids and many families the point at which they decide they're though stay in san francisco or leave. you're going to hear me talking about this layoff a lot this year. i want our middle squirrels to courthousess choose the road to success notes the road th
like the electronics business, just the speed of technology's, you know, exponential. it goes faster. and so that's it--we've always got to be out in front trying to find out what is that next thing that the consumers are looking for. >> and at the top of most consumer surveys is convenience. the variety of lettuce in each package eliminates the need to buy a lot of different heads of lettuce, and thus allows for customized blends. also, the petite size and shape of each
Search Results 71 to 99 of about 100 (some duplicates have been removed)

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